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Weatherby Introduces the Vanguard Modular Chassis Rifle

Weatherby Introduces the Vanguard Modular Chassis Rifle/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379da0b2af0_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379da0b2af0_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Weatherby is taking aim at the precision rifle market with its new Vanguard Modular Chassis Rifle. When it comes to rifle design, Weatherby has stuck to the tried and true. From the Monte Carlo stocks to the blocky butt ends of the bolt, the California manufacturer's firearms boast classic lines and features. But recently, the winds of change swept over one of the company's lines, blowing it squarely into the contemporary. Weatherby is diving into the tactical world head first with the introduction last month of the "Vanguard Modular Chassis" Rifle. And it doesn't take much perusing to discover that the new bolt-action is a marked break from past iterations of the rifle. Related GunDigest Articles Weatherby on Target with Vanguard Adaptive Composite Rifle Gamo Introduces New Hard-Hitting Air Rifle New Rifle: Christensen Arms Modern Precision Rifle In particular, the new Vanguard variation is outfitted with MDT's versatile and lightweight LSS Chassis, a platform that has plenty of potential to enhance the rifle. Not only does the 6061 aluminum chassis provide a ridge platform for the barrel and action, it also has a number of adjustable features that can be used to tailor the rifle to the shooter. Along these lines, the chassis' Luth-AR Modular Buttstock might be the most weighty feature, since it allows both the length of pull and comb height to be fine tuned. The latter feature is particularly important, giving shooters the ability to ensure a tight cheekweld, thus consistent eye-to-optic alignment.

Gun Review: FN PS90 Carbine

Gun Review: FN PS90 Carbine

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379ccab70f3_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379ccab70f3_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Let's look at a new weapons system from Fabrique Nationale: The PS90 carbine. American shooters and law enforcement officers have a history of being a very conventional, traditional, and at times, stodgy lot.  History is replete with examples. How History Bucks Innovation Famous gunfighter and lawman Wild Bill Hickock continued to use a brace of .36 caliber Colt Navy cap-and-ball revolvers as his primary armament until his untimely death in 1883, long after cartridge revolvers were in widespread use. Colt introduced the double-action revolver, in a form that has remained nearly unchanged, in 1892.  Yet lawmen in Western states still continued the use of single-action Colt revolvers until WWII, and probably, even today, you can find a local lawman somewhere in a remote corner of the west (or Alaska) still packing a single-action revolver as primary armament. And speaking of double-action revolvers, the NYPD, the largest police agency in the world, didn’t drop its double-action .38 revolvers as the primary duty weapon until the 1990s. The 1911 single-action pistol has been around since well, 1911. Yet it is only in the last 15 years or so, and particularly in the last five that we have seen a veritable explosion in its popularity and the number of manufacturers making and modifying and providing accessories for this previously “specialist only” pistol-putting this pistol in the hand of seemingly every serious/semi-serious pistol shooter. But it took almost 100 years to get to this point! Another example is stainless steel and synthetic stocks.  These have been available since the 1960s for hunting rifles, but they had been ignored in favor of traditional walnut and blued steel for 30 years or so until the majority of shooters figured out the advantages of these materials in bad weather situations. Lets give some credit where credit is due.  We aren’t always THIS stodgy.  For example the Glock pistol took off like a rocket after initial (and fraudulent) media reports provoked concerns about its polymer construction slowed its acceptance. After the truth came out, the rise to prominence was nearly meteoric and Glock now holds the majority share of the law enforcement market– a remarkable and unparalleled achievement. In doing my review of the FiveseveN pistol and the PS90 carbine, I wanted to keep this history in mind.  As this duo is still relatively new to the civilian shooter (or privately purchased LE market) I felt that the guns should be viewed in terms of three factors, or portions of these factors, in order to determine shooter acceptability. These factors all directly affect the end user, the shooter.  Are these guns, or parts of them innovative, unconventional or odd?  Why?  If the guns are innovative, they will be accepted in rather short order. Glock’s design is innovative. The polymer frames, high reliability and user-friendly simplicity made them a market success.  If guns are unconventional, there will be some acceptance issues.  While an entire weapon may be innovative overall, parts of it may be unconventional.  Glock’s Safe-Action™ trigger system, was at the time of introduction, unconventional — there was no other manual safety on the weapon that had to be engaged or disengaged for use.  There wasn’t even a de-cocker. While today this system is mostly viewed as innovative (and actually normal), there are still a number of police administrators that view Glocks as unsafe and unconventional and will not permit their issue or use. Related GunDigest Articles FN Introduces New FN 509 Pistol New Gun: Ruger's Pistol-Caliber PC Carbine Gun Digest's Five Best Posts on Gun Buying and Gun Selling Finally, if a gun or parts of it are viewed as odd, then we have a serious acceptance problem.  There are two examples that come to mind, both developed in the 1960s, of odd guns that never made it.  The first was the Gyrojet pistol.  This odd weapon fired rocket-powered cartridges in both pistol and rifle form.  It was neither accurate nor particularly powerful. Its rocket projectiles could be stopped by the human hand at the end of the barrel without damage since they hadn’t gained sufficient velocity.  It took several feet of travel to gain appropriate speed. The second was the Dardick pistol, a very strange pistol that was a combination of revolver and semi-automatic pistol that fired a .38 caliber plastic cased “tround” cartridge that contained bullet and powder.  Both guns looked toy-like and are now collector’s items. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! So with these parameters in mind let’s look at a pair of new weapons systems, and the cartridge they fire.  From Fabrique Nationale come the FiveseveN pistol and the PS90 carbine. First lets examine the PS90 carbine. Fabrique Nationale PS90 Carbine The PS90 is the civilian-legal version of the original P90, which was designed as a “personal defense weapon” for specialized military personnel whose main duties do not revolve around the military rifle. These troops are normally issued a pistol as a personal defense weapon. For U.S. forces that pistol is the Beretta M-9.  These soldiers include tank or artillery crews, pilots and air crewmen, and troops operating to the rear of forward areas. However, it has long been felt that the pistol, in the hands of the average soldier is not up to the task.  I have to agree to a large extent.  If our military pistol shooters had trained up to a reasonable level in IPSC or IDPA-style shooting for example, I might feel differently.  But such is not the case and military training with the pistol for non-spec ops personnel is very basic. Further, not everyone has the same abilities. What those in the research areas felt was needed to compensate for lack of proficiency with a pistol was a handy, shoulder-fired weapon of high magazine capacity and adequate power. The goal was to have a firearm that could be carried conveniently for extended periods of time in place of the pistol, and that would allow hits out to 100 yards or so. The PS90 Carbine As a Defensive Weapon This new weapon design was not to be an assault (taking the initiative) weapon, but rather a defensive (holding the position or covering the retreat) weapon. Does the M-1 Carbine of WWII fame come to mind here?  Same problem, different time.  In fact, wasn’t switching to an easier-shooting 9mm from the .45 supposed to solve most of these “problems”?  Guess it didn’t. However, one new wrinkle to the M-1 Carbine twist was that the weapon needed to penetrate the body armor worn by Soviet (Russian) or Chi-com/North Korean forces. Like the original M-1, the new PD weapon needed to be light-recoiling and easy to fire.  Unlike the M-1, it was to be full-auto capable with a large magazine capacity and as a part of FN’s design plan, totally ambidextrous in operation. What FN ended up with was, well, a very cool weapon, futuristic in appearance and totally unique, the P90.  While the P90 is already in use by a number of agencies such as the Secret Service, and is also the signature weapon of the science fiction television show Stargate, it has not been adopted, at least by the U.S., in its intended military role. The civilian-legal counterpart, the PS90, retains most of the characteristics of the original P90 plus all of the overwhelming “cool factor”. Lightweight, Compact Close-Quarter According to the manual the PS90 is a blowback-operated bullpup carbine firing from a closed breach.  It weighs 6.61 lbs. (which is really deceiving, since it seems much lighter, undoubtedly due to its small size), has a maximum width of 2.3 inches and an overall length of only 26.3 inches and has a fixed optical sight. It is truly ambidextrous in operation, with the disk-shaped safety capable of being operated by the trigger finger of either hand, pulling it toward you to fire if you are right-handed, and pushing it away from you if you are left handed. Cartridges are fed through a translucent amber-colored polymer magazine that sits flush on top of the stock, but underneath the sighting module, parallel with the bore and chamber. Release the magazine by operating either of the two magazine releases on either side of the magazine at the chamber. Ejection is downward through the large ejection port, located aft of pistol grip portion of the weapon. No empty casings will hit your face, no matter which way you hold the weapon on while firing. The weapon is charged by grasping one of the ambidextrous cocking handles located on either side of the barrel assembly, and pulling directly backwards.  The trigger, which has been complained about by some, is to me, ok.

Manticore Scorpion Mags Shot Show

Manticore Scorpion Mags  Shot Show

I’m a Scorpion nut. I’ve owned both the rifle and pistol variants of the weapon and absolutely love it as my primary pistol caliber carbine. One of the weak points was the magazines. The polymer feed lips broke quite often in some of the earlier sets of magazines. This problem has long been fixed with CZ’s magazines but metal feed lips will always outclass polymer. (At least for now.)  Manticore is going to be releasing their Scorpion mags and they will be outfitted with lovely metal feed lips. Steel feed lips Scorpion Mags Like traditional CZ Scorpion mags, they are translucent and mostly made from polymer. Unlike CZ’s Scorpion mags they have metal feed lips and fit 32 rounds instead of 30. This gives you an extra double tap when you need it most Manticore arms is pretty well known for making good gear and I’ve never heard anything wrong about Sven and his company. The Old Scorpion magazine I’m a major fan of Lancer magazines and these seem like the CZ variant of Lancer magazines. I really can’t wait for these to hit the market. These are made for Manticore, but will be hitting Prepper Gun shop and sold through them. They will be clear and smoke as well. They’ll be available by the end of first quarter 2017.

What Killed the Bren Ten?

What Killed the Bren Ten?

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f377f80c9620_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f377f80c9620_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Bren Ten, designed by Jeff Cooper, enjoyed a lot of buzz in the 1980s. However, the 10mm pistol was a bulky and expensive product in a market full of small and cheap alternatives. Massad Ayoob recalls the history of the Bren Ten. This handgun popularized the 10mm Auto. The Bren Ten was the handgun story of the early- to mid-1980s. The pundits drooled and salivated. It was predicted that the new cartridge that came out with it, the 10mm Auto, would take over the law enforcement market. It was not to be. Today, the 10mm is popular only among handgun cognoscenti. The Bren Ten itself has long since languished on the ash heap of firearms history. Its creator, the living legend Jeff Cooper, wrote in his column in the April 2004 Guns & Ammo : “The Bren Ten was a concept of mine, and while I am not ashamed of it, I admit that this concept was not entirely sound.” The words had the ring of a eulogy. Pedigree Col. Cooper inspired the Bren Ten as surely as he created the Scout Rifle concept, and for a while, the pistol became his trademark. Indeed, his trademark was on the pistol; the Raven emblem of Jeff ’s famous shooting school Gunsite was prominently emblazoned on the frame of each Bren Ten. Gun writers of the time raved about the gun. Accuracy! Power! Total reliability! Double action or cocked and locked single action carry optional to the shooter! To hear the gun magazines tell it, all other handguns had been rendered obsolete by the coming of this new and wonderful sidearm. Many who might have carried them never did, because of the limited production and the even more limited availability of magazines. The good colonel certainly led the charge, but precious few soldiers were behind him. The Bren Ten literally carried Jeff Cooper’s “brand.” His Gunsite Raven trademark was prominently displayed, and used with his permission on the Bren Ten. Some experts of the period were polite about it, but gave the gun short shrift. Chuck Taylor, who until shortly before had been Jeff Cooper’s right hand man at Gunsite and apparently had some input into the design, blasted the Bren Ten thoroughly in his review of the actual pistol in SWAT magazine. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! Another contemporary expert, Wiley Clapp, would write twenty years later, “For reasons of business, the Bren Ten did not prosper in the marketplace…I don’t know why a larger company hasn’t picked it up, but I suspect it’s because they simply don’t feel it’s a viable product. I owned one for a time and found it to be a decently accurate pistol that tended to the big-and-heavy side…in the long run, the design failed because it was a big, heavy, complicated and expensive service pistol in a market full of small, light, simple and cheap ones.” Related GunDigest Articles Video: Brief History of the Bren Ten Photo Gallery: 20 Semi-Auto Handguns of Gun Digest 2015 Handguns Lead the Way, While Long Gun Sales Plug Along The “Bren Ten cartridge,” the 10mm Auto, would draw more interest…just in different guns. As both a champion shooter and one of the top 1911 pistolsmiths, Mark Morris became a huge fan of the cartridge in the subsequent Colt Delta Elite pistol. So did Ray Chapman, the first world champion of IPSC, who finished up his match days with an Ed Brown-tuned Delta 10mm before hanging up his competition guns in retirement. Jerry Miculek, uncontested as the world’s fastest double action revolver shooter, once told me the gun he kept at bedside was a Smith & Wesson 10mm auto he won at the Second Chance shoot. Chuck Karwan, in many ways the most vocal and articulate champion of the 10mm, had great praise for the S&W Model 1006, and greater for the Glock 20 in the same caliber. The latter gun is the choice of rock star and shooter Ted Nugent, both for self-defense and for much of his hunting. Other famous handgun hunters partial to the Glock 10mm are Jim Cirillo and Paco Kelly, both of whom used handguns for much more serious purposes in law enforcement. Shooting the Bren Ten I shot only a few Bren Tens, but found them reliable except for the .45 caliber conversion unit, and reasonably accurate. The solid steel weight of this well-made pistol helped make up for the muzzle flip that came from its powerful cartridge and its relatively high bore axis. Trigger pulls were smooth, and workmanship was generally quite good. Criticism of the gun’s “complexity,” even from Jeff Cooper, stemmed largely from a cross-bolt safety run through the slide to act as a firing pin block, which rendered the gun drop-safe. This was necessary, developers Dixon and Dornaus apparently felt, for safety and liability reasons.

Reloading Techniques that Save Headaches or Worse

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f37603ec8797_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f37603ec8797_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Safety should be the first and foremost concern when it comes to reloading ammo. When it comes to reloading techniques, there are some tricks and tips master ballistician Phil Massaro has picked up that make it safer and more efficient. Everyone has their own style in this world, different strokes for different folks. However, some things that people attribute to style can be downright dangerous. Let’s talk about some simple and safe reloading techniques, which might save you wounded pride, or worse, body. Priming When it comes to priming your cartridges, I used to just dump a bunch of primers into the tray, and have at it. I’ve ended up trying to prime a case that is already primed (ruining the existing primer), and I’ve ended up with a case that has powder trickling out of the unprimed pocket. Nowadays, I dispense the exact amount of primers I need for the cases I have in the case block. If I end up with more cases than I have primers for, I know to get on my hands and knees and check the floor for a primer that has dropped so it doesn’t end up in the vacuum cleaner or elsewhere. Related GunDigest Articles Reloading Ammo: Pitfalls of Using Old Pistol Reloading Data Reloading Ammo: The Precise Business of Reloading AR Cartridges Reloading Ammo: An Abbreviated Look at Reloading Short Magnums Charging I have friends, who are safe people in general, that will set 40 or 50 primed cases into a case block, and charge each case before seating the bullets into them. It makes for a good system, but it leaves open the opportunity for a double charge, or no charge at all. I have done the ‘no-charge-at-all’ thing; it’s a mistake that almost everyone will make if they load enough cartridges. I’m not proud of it, and I’ve taken every precaution to see it never happens again. Thank goodness I’ve never had to deal with a double-charge, as the results of those can be deadly, or at least maiming. I have modified the procedure a bit, to make things a bit safer. I still place the primed cases into the blocks, but I charge them with powder one at a time, and then immediately install the bullet and seat it. This alleviates a couple different problems.

Gerbers Center-Drive Multi-Tool: The multi-tool just got a reality check.

I got a chance to look at Gerber’s NEW Center-Drive Multi-Tool.  It has just what I need and nothing that I don’t. This multi-tool offers a revolutionary design, the tool works in the real world. The innovative center-axis driver opens to align like a real screw driver, yielding maximum torque and rotation. No productivity is sacrificed with the addition of a 30% longer outboard blade and one-thumb opening sliding jaws. Full size, real tools – the multi-tool just got a reality check. Another feature I really like is the pry bar, yes, a pry bar. Knives are tools.  I have broke many knives trying to pry with a knife blade. Now, I can save the blade and pry with a bar. Get your very own Gerber right HERE $119

Summary

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